Audio story: Turkey's ban on YouTube

10/09/2010

In Turkey, the ban on YouTube is an upshot of the collision between the country's restrictive legal system and the Information Age.

By Alexander Christie-Miller for Southeast European Times in Istanbul -- 10/09/10

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As many as 6,000 websites are blocked by Turkey. [AFP]

For more than three years now, internet users in Turkey have been blocked from the video-sharing site YouTube because of clips that allegedly insult the country's founder, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

Since Ankara drafted its first internet laws in 2007, the number of sites blocked has increased from 433 a year after the ban, to as many as 6,000 sites today.

In the case of YouTube, there's no solution in sight. The company refuses to accept Turkey's demand that it remove the videos altogether, rather than merely blocking access to them.

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